Quantcast

Town reflects on lake sanitation

Vacuum sewer system proposed for lakeside residents

Aerial drawings were created to illustrate characteristics of the proposed vacuum-sewer system that would encompass Cazenovia Lake. Representatives from AIRVAC estimate the project would cost about $4.6 million, and drastically improve the lake’s water quality.

Aerial drawings were created to illustrate characteristics of the proposed vacuum-sewer system that would encompass Cazenovia Lake. Representatives from AIRVAC estimate the project would cost about $4.6 million, and drastically improve the lake’s water quality.

photo

Courtesy of Dunn & Sgromo Engineers

An aerial view of the four proposed water and sewer districts that would surround Cazenovia Lake.

— Vacuum sewer systems keep raw wastewater out of the environment. They work by using traditional plumbing systems to deposit wastewater into a sealed tank located onsite at a residence. From this tank, a pneumatic valve propels sewage into a sealed vacuum main and then to a vacuum station. After arriving at the vacuum station, wastewater is pumped to a treatment plant for processing.

At the town and village meeting a representative from AIRVAC, the world’s largest vacuum sewer system manufacturer, offered a proposal to fix the sanitation issues on Cazenovia Lake.

AIRVAC’s proposal included two vacuum stations, one on the east side of the lake and another on the lake’s west side. Each vacuum station could operate independently of the other, meaning that this system could be introduced to the lake in phases.

AIRVAC’s estimate for the installation of this system was $2.9 million for the west side of the lake, and $1.7 million for the east side.

John Dunkle, Cazenovia’s town engineer added $2.9 million on top of AIRVAC’s $4.6 million estimate for the project. This brought the total estimated cost of the project to $7.5 million.

“This [estimate is] very preliminary, just to get an idea of what such a thing might cost, because the goal of this, at this point, is to put together some very preliminary numbers and present them to the potential users, “ said Dunkle.

“We were being very cautious, and overestimating the cost because we thought it was better than underestimating and surprising people,” Town of Cazenovia Supervisor Ralph Monforte, who is also a member of the Cazenovia Lake Watershed Council, said.

Currently, the plan is to solely charge residents who can hook into the vacuum sewer for the system’s installation and maintenance. These residents will have the opportunity to vote for or against the installation of this system.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

cschicho 2 years, 10 months ago

Just WHERE do you think the lakefront residents are going to get all this cash... We already pay 3 times the taxes of the average resident of Cazenovia. For the last 8 years, we have been required to have septic inspections/maintenance overseen by the town... How on earth is that check system in place not working? From someone who spent over $20K on a new septic a few years back, this idea of spending 7.2 million dollars is preposterous. Get a clue folks, MILFOIL IS AN INVASIVE WEED. Watching the powers that be spend $400K on herbicide when systematic dredging could have been well underway to rid the lake of the weeds was painful enough, but proposing lakefront residents spend $7.2 mil instead of cracking down on a few septics that aren't working is unbelievable!

0

Sign in to comment